Culture Collections

Bacteria and Mycoplasmas Detail

Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety

Bacteria Collection: Escherichia coli

NCTC Number: NCTC 9001
Current Name: Escherichia coli
Original Strain Reference: 9001 U 5/41
Other Collection No: WDCM 00090; DSM 30083;ATCC 11775;CCM 5172;CIP 54.8;IAM 12119;JCM 1649;NCDO 1989;U5/41
Previous Catalogue Name: Escherichia coli (MIGULA 1895) CASTELLANI and CHALMERS 1919 (AL)
Status of Strain: T
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Antigenic Properties: serovar o1:k1(l1):h7
Conditions for growth on solid media: nutrient agar,37, facultative anaerobe
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient agar,37, facultative anaerobe
Isolated From: human, urine, cystitis
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|X80725|ATCC 11775T|E.coli (ATCC 11775T) gene for 16S rRNA.| agtttgatcatggct... >gb|AB242910|JCM1649|Escherichia coli gene for 16S ribosomal RNA, partial sequence,strain: JCM1649.| gctaataccgcataa...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AJ278710|K12 DSM 30083T|Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene, strain K12 DSM 30083T.| taagcgactaagcgt... >gb|AJ549508|TYPE STRAIN: DSM 30083|Escherichia coli partial 23S rRNA gene, type strain DSM 30083T.| tcatttaaagaaagc...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AB242918|JCM1649|Escherichia coli gyrB gene for gyrase B, complete cds, strain:JCM1649.| cagcgcgagggtaaa...
Bibliography: OPINION 26,JUDICIAL COMMISION 1963 INT BULL BACT NOMENC TAXON 13 35;
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95492
Author(s): Fukushima,M.;Kakinuma,K.;Kawaguchi,R.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Phylogenetic analysis of Salmonella, Shigella, and Escherichia coli strains on the basis of the gyrB gene sequence
Volume: 40
Page(s): 2779-85
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): DNA Gyrase/*genetics DNA, Bacterial/analysis DNA, Ribosomal/analysis Escherichia coli/classification/*genetics Humans Molecular Sequence Data *Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics Salmonella/classification/*genetics Shigella/classification/*genetics
Remarks: Phylogenetic analysis of about 200 strains of Salmonella, Shigella, and Escherichia coli was carried out using the nucleotide sequence of the gene for DNA gyrase B (gyrB), which was determined by directly sequencing PCR fragments. The results establish a new phylogenetic tree for the classification of Salmonella, Shigella, and Escherichia coli in which Salmonella forms a cluster separate from but closely related to Shigella and E. coli. In comparison with 16S rRNA analysis, the gyrB sequences indicated a greater evolutionary divergence for the bacteria. Thus, in screening for the presence of bacteria, the gyrB gene might be a useful tool for differentiating between closely related species of bacteria such as Shigella spp. and E. coli. At present, 16S rRNA sequence analysis is an accurate and rapid method for identifying most unknown bacteria to the genus level because the highly conserved 16S rRNA region is easy to amplify; however, analysis of the more variable gyrB sequence region can identify unknown bacteria to the species level. In summary, we have shown that gyrB sequence analysis is a useful alternative to 16S rRNA analysis for constructing the phylogenetic relationships of bacteria, in particular for the classification of closely related bacterial species.
URL: 12149329
Ref #: 95485
Author(s): Fuchs,B.M.;Syutsubo,K.;Ludwig,W.;Amann,R.
Journal: Appl Environ Microbiol
Title: In situ accessibility of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA to fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes
Volume: 67
Page(s): 961-8
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): Escherichia coli/*genetics/growth & development Flow Cytometry *Fluorescent Dyes In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence/methods Oligonucleotide Probes/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics
Remarks: One of the main causes of failure of fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides, besides low cellular ribosome content and impermeability of cell walls, is the inaccessibility of probe target sites due to higher-order structure of the ribosome. Analogous to a study on the 16S rRNA (B. M. Fuchs, G. Wallner, W. Beisker, I. Schwippl, W. Ludwig, and R. Amann, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:4973-4982, 1998), the accessibility of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli DSM 30083(T) was studied in detail with a set of 184 CY3-labeled oligonucleotide probes. The probe-conferred fluorescence was quantified flow cytometrically. The brightest signal resulted from probe 23S-2018, complementary to positions 2018 to 2035. The distribution of probe-conferred cell fluorescence in six arbitrarily set brightness classes (classes I to VI, 100 to 81%, 80 to 61%, 60 to 41%, 40 to 21%, 20 to 6%, and 5 to 0% of the brightness of 23S-2018, respectively) was as follows: class I, 3%; class II, 21%; class III, 35%; class IV, 18%; class V, 16%; and class VI, 7%. A fine-resolution analysis of selected areas confirmed steep changes in accessibility on the 23S RNA to oligonucleotide probes. This is similar to the situation for the 16S rRNA. Indeed, no significant differences were found between the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes to 16S and 23S rRNA. Interestingly, indications were obtained of an effect of the type of fluorescent dye coupled to a probe on in situ accessibility. The results were translated into an accessibility map for the 23S rRNA of E. coli, which may be extrapolated to other bacteria. Thereby, it may contribute to a better exploitation of the high potential of the 23S rRNA for identification of bacteria in the future.
URL: 11157269
Ref #: 95479
Author(s): Mitterer,G.;Huber,M.;Leidinger,E.;Kirisits,C.;Lubitz,W.;Mueller,M.W.;Schmidt,W.M.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Microarray-based identification of bacteria in clinical samples by solid-phase PCR amplification of 23S ribosomal DNA sequences
Volume: 42
Page(s): 1048-57
Year: 2004
Keyword(s): Abortion, Veterinary/microbiology Animals Bacteria/*genetics/*isolation & purification Base Sequence DNA Primers DNA, Bacterial/genetics/isolation & purification DNA, Ribosomal/*genetics/isolation & purification Female Horses *Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods Pregnancy Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/microbiology/veterinary RNA, Bacterial/genetics/isolation & purification RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics/isolation & purification
Remarks: The rapid identification of the bacteria in clinical samples is important for patient management and antimicrobial therapy. We describe a DNA microarray-based PCR approach for the quick detection and identification of bacteria from cervical swab specimens from mares. This on-chip PCR method combines the amplification of a variable region of bacterial 23S ribosomal DNA and the simultaneous sequence-specific detection on a solid phase. The solid phase contains bacterial species-specific primers covalently bound to a glass support. During the solid-phase amplification reaction the polymerase elongates perfectly matched primers and incorporates biotin-labeled nucleotides. The reaction products are visualized by streptavidin-cyanine 5 staining, followed by fluorescence scanning. This procedure successfully identified from pure cultures 22 bacteria that are common causes of abortion and sterility in mares. Using the on-chip PCR method, we also tested 21 cervical swab specimens from mares for the presence of pathogenic bacteria and compared the results with those of conventional bacteriological culture methods. Our method correctly identified the bacteria in 12 cervical swab samples, 8 of which contained more than one bacterial species. Due to the higher sensitivity of the on-chip PCR, this method identified bacteria in five cervical swab samples which were not detected by the conventional identification procedure. Our results show that this method will have great potential to be incorporated into the routine microbiology laboratory.
URL: 15004052
Ref #: 12690
Author(s): Cilia,V.;Lafay,B.;Christen,R.
Journal: Mol Biol Evol
Title: Sequence heterogeneities among 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, and their effect on phylogenetic analyses at the species level
Volume: 13
Page(s): 451-61
Year: 1996
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80675 GENBANK/X80676 GENBANK/X80677 GENBANK/X80678 GENBANK/X80679 GENBANK/X80680 GENBANK/X80681 GENBANK/X80682 GENBANK/X80683 GENBANK/X80684 GENBANK/X80721 GENBANK/X80722 GENBANK/X80723 GENBANK/X80724 GENBANK/X80725 GENBANK/X80726 GENBANK/X80727 GENBANK/X80728 GENBANK/X80729 GENBANK/X80730 GENBANK/X80731 GENBANK/X80732 GENBANK/X80733 GENBANK/X80734 Bacteria/classification/*genetics Base Sequence Comparative Study DNA, Bacterial/chemistry Escherichia coli/classification/genetics Molecular Sequence Data Operon *Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry/*genetics Salmonella/classification/genetics Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Shigella/classification/genetics Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: We have analyzed what phylogenetic signal can be derived by small subunit rRNA comparison for bacteria of different but closely related genera (enterobacteria) and for different species or strains within a single genus (Escherichia or Salmonella), and finally how similar are the ribosomal operons within a single organism (Escherichia coli). These sequences have been analyzed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and parsimony. The robustness of each topology was assessed by bootstrap. Sequences were obtained for the seven rrn operons of E. coli strain PK3. These data demonstrated differences located in three highly variable domains. Their nature and localization suggest that since the divergence of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium, most point mutations that occurred within each gene have been propagated among the gene family by conversions involving short domains, and that homogenization by conversions may not have affected the entire sequence of each gene. We show that the differences that exist between the different operons are ignored when sequences are obtained either after cloning of a single operon or directly from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Direct sequencing of PCR products produces a mean sequence in which mutations present in the most variable domains become hidden. Cloning a single operon results in a sequence that differs from that of the other operons and of the mean sequence by several point mutations. For identification of unknown bacteria at the species level or below, a mean sequence or the sequence of a single nonidentified operon should therefore be avoided. Taking into account the seven operons and therefore mutations that accumulate in the most variable domains would perhaps increase tree resolution. However, if gene conversions that homogenize the rRNA multigene family are rare events, some nodes in phylogenetic trees will reflect these recombination events and these trees may therefore be gene trees rather than organismal trees.
URL: 96351315
Ref #: 12687
Author(s): Fuchs,B.M.;Syutsubo,K.;Ludwig,W.;Amann,R.
Journal: Appl Environ Microbiol
Title: In situ accessibility of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA to fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes
Volume: 67
Page(s): 961-8
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): Escherichia coli/*genetics/growth & development Flow Cytometry *Fluorescent Dyes In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence/methods Oligonucleotide Probes/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: One of the main causes of failure of fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides, besides low cellular ribosome content and impermeability of cell walls, is the inaccessibility of probe target sites due to higher-order structure of the ribosome. Analogous to a study on the 16S rRNA (B. M. Fuchs, G. Wallner, W. Beisker, I. Schwippl, W. Ludwig, and R. Amann, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:4973-4982, 1998), the accessibility of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli DSM 30083(T) was studied in detail with a set of 184 CY3-labeled oligonucleotide probes. The probe-conferred fluorescence was quantified flow cytometrically. The brightest signal resulted from probe 23S-2018, complementary to positions 2018 to 2035. The distribution of probe-conferred cell fluorescence in six arbitrarily set brightness classes (classes I to VI, 100 to 81%, 80 to 61%, 60 to 41%, 40 to 21%, 20 to 6%, and 5 to 0% of the brightness of 23S-2018, respectively) was as follows: class I, 3%; class II, 21%; class III, 35%; class IV, 18%; class V, 16%; and class VI, 7%. A fine-resolution analysis of selected areas confirmed steep changes in accessibility on the 23S RNA to oligonucleotide probes. This is similar to the situation for the 16S rRNA. Indeed, no significant differences were found between the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes to 16S and 23S rRNA. Interestingly, indications were obtained of an effect of the type of fluorescent dye coupled to a probe on in situ accessibility. The results were translated into an accessibility map for the 23S rRNA of E. coli, which may be extrapolated to other bacteria. Thereby, it may contribute to a better exploitation of the high potential of the 23S rRNA for identification of bacteria in the future.
URL: 21091995
Ref #: 1300
Author(s): Skerman,V.B.D.;McGowan,V.;Sneath,P.H.A.(ed)
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.
Volume: 30
Page(s): 225-420
Year: 1980
Ref #: 4300
Author(s): Jagnow,G.;Haider,K.;Ellwardt,P.-C.
Journal: Arch. Microbiol.
Title: Anaerobic dechlorination and degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers by anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.
Volume: 115
Page(s): 285-292
Year: 1977
Data: (ATCC 11775, NCIB 11943, DSM 30083, CN 4382) Type strain / F. Kauffmann, Copenhagen in 1952 / Urine, cystitis / Pathogenic to chicks / 01:K1 (L1):H7 Also listed under Escherichia coli serotypes (vide infra) / Opinion 26, Judicial Commission (1963) Int. Bull. bact. Nomencl. Taxon. 13, 35
Accession Date: 01/01/1952
Authority: (Migula 1895) Castellani and Chalmers 1919
Depositor: F KAUFFMANN
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S1192 (Escherichia coli (Migula 1895) Castellani and Chalmers 1919) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

Additional Information

Note: Links open in a new window

related productsRelated Products

You might be interested in the following related products:

Note:

The Culture Collections hold cell cultures, bacteria, fungi and virus strains from worldwide sources. Our scientists ensure that the identification of the cultures is correct and they remain unchanged from when they are first deposited with the Collection. Nevertheless, some of the data we provide about the cultures is supplied by the person depositing the strains and, although we have multiple checking procedures in place, we cannot always verify all their data. Please note that the Culture Collections cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies in the data provided by the depositors.

Cultures supplied by Culture Collections are to be used as controls for microbiology testing and for research purposes only. Please view the Terms & Conditions of Supply for more information.

Contact us if you want to discuss commercial use of the cultures.

Available Formats

Ampoule (Bacteria)

Formats Price
  • Ampoule (Bacteria)
    In Stock
    £65.00
Quantity
Credit Account orders accepted or email / fax your order to us.






Back to top
Copyright © PHE 2013. All rights reserved.