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Bacteria Collection: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium

NCTC Number: NCTC 74
Current Name: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium
Also Known As: Salmonella Typhimurium
Original Strain Reference: Mutton
Other Collection No: ATCC 13311; DSM 5569; MUTTON; WDCM 00121
Previous Catalogue Name: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica
Type Strain: No
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Antigenic Properties: serotype Typhimurium serovar 4,5,12:i: 1,2
Conditions for growth on solid media: Nutrient / Columbia blood agar, 24 hours, 37°C, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, facultative anaerobe
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS473429
Annotated Genome: ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/project/pathogens/NCTC3000/...
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|X80681|ATCC 13311|S.typhimurium 16S rRNA gene.| naattgaagagtttg...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AY370865|ATCC 13311|Salmonella typhimurium strain ATCC 13311 gyrase B (gyrB) gene,partial cds.| aaagtctccggcggt...
Bibliography: OPINION 26 1963 INT BULL BACT NOMENC TAXON 13 35
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95540
Author(s): Gensberg,K.;Jin,Y.F.;Piddock,L.J.
Journal: FEMS Microbiol Lett
Title: A novel gyrB mutation in a fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolate of Salmonella typhimurium
Volume: 132
Page(s): 57-60
Year: 1995
Keyword(s): GENBANK/U30842 Anti-Infective Agents/*pharmacology Base Sequence Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology DNA Gyrase DNA Topoisomerases, Type II/*genetics DNA, Bacterial/chemistry Drug Resistance, Microbial/genetics *Fluoroquinolones Humans Microbial Sensitivity Tests Molecular Sequence Data *Mutation Nalidixic Acid/pharmacology Quinolones/pharmacology Salmonella typhimurium/drug effects/*genetics
Remarks: In order to study the role of gyrB in antibiotic resistance in post-ciprofloxacin therapy fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella typhimurium, plasmid pBP548, which contains the Escherichia coli gyrB gene, was used in complementation studies. In a heterodiploid strain, the wild-type (quinolone sensitive) allele is dominant over the resistant allele therefore, eleven clinical isolates were complemented with gyrB encoded on pBP548. Only one transformant, L18pBP548, exhibited increased susceptibility to the quinolones nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and sparfloxacin. The amino acid sequence of the gyrase B protein from a wild-type and the pre-therapy S. typhimurium (deduced from the nucleotide sequence) was identical to that of E. coli from codons 436 to 470; however, a point mutation was identified in codon 463 of gyrB of the quinolone-resistant post-therapy isolate L18, giving rise to an amino acid substitution of serine to tyrosine.
URL: 7590165
Ref #: 95539
Author(s): Cilia,V.;Lafay,B.;Christen,R.
Journal: Mol Biol Evol
Title: Sequence heterogeneities among 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, and their effect on phylogenetic analyses at the species level
Volume: 13
Page(s): 451-61
Year: 1996
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80675 GENBANK/X80676 GENBANK/X80677 GENBANK/X80678 GENBANK/X80679 GENBANK/X80680 GENBANK/X80681 GENBANK/X80682 GENBANK/X80683 GENBANK/X80684 GENBANK/X80721 GENBANK/X80722 GENBANK/X80723 GENBANK/X80724 GENBANK/X80725 GENBANK/X80726 GENBANK/X80727 GENBANK/X80728 GENBANK/X80729 GENBANK/X80730 GENBANK/X80731 GENBANK/X80732 GENBANK/X80733 GENBANK/X80734 Bacteria/classification/*genetics Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial/chemistry Escherichia coli/classification/genetics Molecular Sequence Data Operon *Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry/*genetics Salmonella/classification/genetics Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Shigella/classification/genetics
Remarks: We have analyzed what phylogenetic signal can be derived by small subunit rRNA comparison for bacteria of different but closely related genera (enterobacteria) and for different species or strains within a single genus (Escherichia or Salmonella), and finally how similar are the ribosomal operons within a single organism (Escherichia coli). These sequences have been analyzed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and parsimony. The robustness of each topology was assessed by bootstrap. Sequences were obtained for the seven rrn operons of E. coli strain PK3. These data demonstrated differences located in three highly variable domains. Their nature and localization suggest that since the divergence of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium, most point mutations that occurred within each gene have been propagated among the gene family by conversions involving short domains, and that homogenization by conversions may not have affected the entire sequence of each gene. We show that the differences that exist between the different operons are ignored when sequences are obtained either after cloning of a single operon or directly from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Direct sequencing of PCR products produces a mean sequence in which mutations present in the most variable domains become hidden. Cloning a single operon results in a sequence that differs from that of the other operons and of the mean sequence by several point mutations. For identification of unknown bacteria at the species level or below, a mean sequence or the sequence of a single nonidentified operon should therefore be avoided. Taking into account the seven operons and therefore mutations that accumulate in the most variable domains would perhaps increase tree resolution. However, if gene conversions that homogenize the rRNA multigene family are rare events, some nodes in phylogenetic trees will reflect these recombination events and these trees may therefore be gene trees rather than organismal trees.
URL: 8742634
Ref #: 43181
Author(s): Delmas,J.;Breysse,F.;Devulder,G.;Flandrois,J.P.;Chomarat,M.
Journal: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis
Title: Rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae by sequencing DNA gyrase subunit B encoding gene
Volume: 55
Page(s): 263-8
Year: 2006
Keyword(s): Bacterial Typing Techniques/*methods DNA Gyrase/*genetics Enterobacteriaceae/enzymology/genetics/*isolation & purification Genotype Humans Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods
Remarks: Real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to characterize a 506-bp-long DNA fragment internal to the gyrB gene (gyrBint). The sequences obtained from 32 Enterobacteriaceae-type strains and those available in the Genbank nucleotide sequence database (n = 24) were used as a database to identify 240 clinical enterobacteria isolates. Sequence analysis of the gyrBint fragment of 240 strains showed that gyrBint constitutes a discriminative target sequence to differentiate between Enterobacteriaceae species. Comparison of these identifications with those obtained by phenotypic methods (Vitek 1 system and/or Rapid ID 32E; bioMerieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) revealed discrepancies essentially with genera Citrobacter and Enterobacter. Most of the strains identified as Enterobacter cloacae by phenotypic methods were identified as Enterobacter hormaechei strains by gyrBint sequencing. The direct sequencing of gyrBint would be useful as a complementary tool in the identification of clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.
URL: 16626902
Ref #: 12690
Author(s): Cilia,V.;Lafay,B.;Christen,R.
Journal: Mol Biol Evol
Title: Sequence heterogeneities among 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, and their effect on phylogenetic analyses at the species level
Volume: 13
Page(s): 451-61
Year: 1996
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80675 GENBANK/X80676 GENBANK/X80677 GENBANK/X80678 GENBANK/X80679 GENBANK/X80680 GENBANK/X80681 GENBANK/X80682 GENBANK/X80683 GENBANK/X80684 GENBANK/X80721 GENBANK/X80722 GENBANK/X80723 GENBANK/X80724 GENBANK/X80725 GENBANK/X80726 GENBANK/X80727 GENBANK/X80728 GENBANK/X80729 GENBANK/X80730 GENBANK/X80731 GENBANK/X80732 GENBANK/X80733 GENBANK/X80734 Bacteria/classification/*genetics Base Sequence Comparative Study DNA, Bacterial/chemistry Escherichia coli/classification/genetics Molecular Sequence Data Operon *Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction RNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry/*genetics Salmonella/classification/genetics Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Shigella/classification/genetics Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: We have analyzed what phylogenetic signal can be derived by small subunit rRNA comparison for bacteria of different but closely related genera (enterobacteria) and for different species or strains within a single genus (Escherichia or Salmonella), and finally how similar are the ribosomal operons within a single organism (Escherichia coli). These sequences have been analyzed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and parsimony. The robustness of each topology was assessed by bootstrap. Sequences were obtained for the seven rrn operons of E. coli strain PK3. These data demonstrated differences located in three highly variable domains. Their nature and localization suggest that since the divergence of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium, most point mutations that occurred within each gene have been propagated among the gene family by conversions involving short domains, and that homogenization by conversions may not have affected the entire sequence of each gene. We show that the differences that exist between the different operons are ignored when sequences are obtained either after cloning of a single operon or directly from polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Direct sequencing of PCR products produces a mean sequence in which mutations present in the most variable domains become hidden. Cloning a single operon results in a sequence that differs from that of the other operons and of the mean sequence by several point mutations. For identification of unknown bacteria at the species level or below, a mean sequence or the sequence of a single nonidentified operon should therefore be avoided. Taking into account the seven operons and therefore mutations that accumulate in the most variable domains would perhaps increase tree resolution. However, if gene conversions that homogenize the rRNA multigene family are rare events, some nodes in phylogenetic trees will reflect these recombination events and these trees may therefore be gene trees rather than organismal trees.
URL: 96351315
Ref #: 1300
Author(s): Skerman,V.B.D.;McGowan,V.;Sneath,P.H.A.(ed)
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.
Volume: 30
Page(s): 225-420
Year: 1980
Ref #: 4006
Journal: Int. Bull. Bacteriol. Nomencl. Taxon.
Volume: 13
Page(s): 36
Year: 1963
Ref #: 4007
Journal: Int. Bull. Bacteriol. Nomencl. Taxon.
Volume: 9
Page(s): 108-109
Year: 1959
Ref #: 6924
Author(s): DeutschesInstitutfürNormungDIN.NormenausschußMedizin(NAMed)
Title: DIN 58959-7. Qualitätsmanagement in der medizinischen Mikrobiologie. Teil 7: Allgemeine Anforderungen an das Mitführen von Kontrollstämmen. Beiblatt 2: ATCC- und DSM-Nummern häufig verwendeter Kontrollstämme.
Year: 1997
Data: (ATCC 13311) Type strain of Salmonella typhimurium / Lister Institute in 1920 / Food poisoning in 1911 / Opinion 26 (1963) Int. Bull. bact. Nomencl. Taxon. 13, 35 / IS200 profile IP 2. 2 / Stanley, J. et al. (1993) J. gen. Microbiol. 139, 1133
Accession Date: 01/01/1920
History: SOURCE FROM CASE OF FOOD POISONING IN 1911
Authority: (LE MINOR et al. 1982) LE MINOR and POPOFF 1987
Depositor: LISTER INSTITUTE
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S9096 (Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (ex kauffmann and edwards 1952) le minor and popoff 1987) - Date of change: 16/06/2007 by NCTCUp to 16/06/2007: S2674 (Salmonella typhimurium (Loeffler 1892) Castellani and Chalmers 1919) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Other: Serotype Typhimurium4, 5, 12:i:1, 2Salmonella SUBSPECIES I
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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