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Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety





Bacteria Collection: Proteus mirabilis

NCTC Number: NCTC 11938
Current Name: Proteus mirabilis
Original Strain Reference: CDC PR14
Other Collection No: ATCC 29906; CDC PR14; DSM 4479; WDCM 00023
Previous Catalogue Name: Proteus mirabilis
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: Nutrient agar, 24 hours, 37°C, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, facultative anaerobe
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS513148
Annotated Genome: ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/project/pathogens/NCTC3000/d...
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AJ301683|CIP103181T (ATCC29906T)|Proteus vulgaris 16S rRNA gene, strain CIP103181T.| actctggttgatcat... >gb|AJ301682|CIP103181T (ATCC29906T)|Proteus mirabilis 16S rRNA gene, strain CIP103181T.| tggggttgatcatgg... >gb|AF008582|ATCC 29906T|Proteus mirabilis 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence.| tgatcctggctcaga... >gb|DQ885256|NCTC 11938|Proteus mirabilis strain NCTC 11938 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partialsequence.| tggggttgatcatgg...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AY116929|ATCC 29906|Proteus mirabilis strain ATCC 29906 23S ribosomal RNA gene, partialsequence.| ggttaagcgaataag...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AJ300546|CIP 103181T| ATCC 29906T|Proteus mirabilis partial gyrB gene for DNA gyrase B subunit strainCIP 103181T, ATCC 29906T.| ataagtttgatgata...
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95511
Author(s): Mollet,C.;Drancourt,M.;Raoult,D.
Journal: Mol Microbiol
Title: rpoB sequence analysis as a novel basis for bacterial identification
Volume: 26
Page(s): 1005-11
Year: 1998
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF008577 GENBANK/AF008579 GENBANK/AF008581 GENBANK/AF008582 GENBANK/U77434 GENBANK/U77435 GENBANK/U77436 GENBANK/U77437 GENBANK/U77438 GENBANK/U77439 GENBANK/U77440 GENBANK/U77441 GENBANK/U77443 GENBANK/U77445 GENBANK/U77446 GENBANK/U77447 GENBANK/U77448 GENBANK/U77449 GENBANK/U77450 GENBANK/U77451 GENBANK/U77452 GENBANK/U77453 GENBANK/U78182 GENBANK/U78183 GENBANK/X13854 DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/*genetics Databases, Factual Enterobacteriaceae/genetics Evolution, Molecular RNA, Ribosomal, 16S *Sequence Analysis, DNA
Remarks: Comparison of the sequences of conserved genes, most commonly those encoding 16S rRNA, is used for bacterial genotypic identification. Among some taxa, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, variation within this gene does not allow confident species identification. We investigated the usefulness of RNA polymerase beta-subunit encoding gene (rpoB) sequences as an alternative tool for universal bacterial genotypic identification. We generated a database of partial rpoB for 14 Enterobacteriaceae species and then assessed the intra- and interspecies divergence between the rpoB and the 16S rRNA genes by pairwise comparisons. We found that levels of divergence between the rpoB sequences of different strains were markedly higher than those between their 16S rRNA genes. This higher discriminatory power was further confirmed by assigning 20 blindly selected clinical isolates to the correct enteric species on the basis of rpoB sequence comparison. Comparison of rpoB sequences from Enterobacteriaceae was also used as the basis for their phylogenetic analysis and demonstrated the genus Klebsiella to be polyphyletic. The trees obtained with rpoB were more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Enterobacteriaceae than those obtained with 16S rRNA. These data indicate that rpoB is a powerful identification tool, which may be useful for universal bacterial identification.
URL: 9426137
Ref #: 95491
Author(s): Weigel,L.M.;Anderson,G.J.;Tenover,F.C.
Journal: Antimicrob Agents Chemother
Title: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Proteus mirabilis
Volume: 46
Page(s): 2582-7
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF363611 GENBANK/AF397169 GENBANK/AF503505 GENBANK/AF503506 Amino Acid Sequence Amino Acid Substitution/genetics Anti-Infective Agents/*pharmacology DNA Gyrase/*genetics DNA Primers DNA Topoisomerase IV/*genetics DNA, Bacterial/analysis/genetics Drug Resistance, Microbial Fluoroquinolones Microbial Sensitivity Tests Molecular Sequence Data Mutation/genetics Proteus mirabilis/*genetics Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Remarks: Mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis were determined by genetic analysis of the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. This study included the P. mirabilis type strain ATCC 29906 and 29 clinical isolates with reduced susceptibility (MIC, 0.5 to 2 microg/ml) or resistance (MIC, > or =4 microg/ml) to ciprofloxacin. Susceptibility profiles for ciprofloxacin, clinafloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and trovafloxacin were correlated with amino acid changes in the QRDRs. Decreased susceptibility and resistance were associated with double mutations involving both gyrA (S83R or -I) and parC (S80R or -I). Among these double mutants, MICs of ciprofloxacin varied from 1 to 16 microg/ml, indicating that additional factors, such as drug efflux or porin changes, also contribute to the level of resistance. For ParE, a single conservative change of V364I was detected in seven strains. An unexpected result was the association of gyrB mutations with high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones in 12 of 20 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. Changes in GyrB included S464Y (six isolates), S464F (three isolates), and E466D (two isolates). A three-nucleotide insertion, resulting in an additional lysine residue between K455 and A456, was detected in gyrB of one strain. Unlike any other bacterial species analyzed to date, mutation of gyrB appears to be a frequent event in the acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance among clinical isolates of P. mirabilis.
URL: 12121936
Ref #: 48709
Author(s): Dauga,C.
Journal: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol
Title: Evolution of the gyrB gene and the molecular phylogeny of Enterobacteriaceae: a model molecule for molecular systematic studies
Volume: 52
Page(s): 531-47
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AJ300528 GENBANK/AJ300529 GENBANK/AJ300530 GENBANK/AJ300531 GENBANK/AJ300532 GENBANK/AJ300533 GENBANK/AJ300534 GENBANK/AJ300535 GENBANK/AJ300536 GENBANK/AJ300537 GENBANK/AJ300538 GENBANK/AJ300539 GENBANK/AJ300540 GENBANK/AJ300541 GENBANK/AJ300542 GENBANK/AJ300543 GENBANK/AJ300544 GENBANK/AJ300545 GENBANK/AJ300546 GENBANK/AJ300547 GENBANK/AJ300548 GENBANK/AJ300549 GENBANK/AJ300550 GENBANK/AJ300551 GENBANK/AJ300552 GENBANK/AJ300553 GENBANK/AJ300554 DNA Gyrase/*genetics Enterobacteriaceae/*classification/genetics Evolution, Molecular Genes, rRNA Molecular Sequence Data Phenotype RNA, Bacterial/chemistry RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry
Remarks: Phylogenetic trees showing the evolutionary relatedness of Enterobacteriaceae based upon gyrB and 16S rRNA genes were compared. Congruence among trees of these molecules indicates that the genomes of these species are not completely mosaic and that molecular systematic studies can be carried out. Phylogenetic trees based on gyrB sequences appeared to be more reliable at determining relationships among Serratia species than trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. gyrB sequences from Serratia species formed a monophyletic group validated by significant bootstrap values. Serratia fonticola had the most deeply branching gyrB sequence in the Serratia monophyletic group, which was consistent with its atypical phenotypic characteristics. Klebsiella and Enterobacter genera seemed to be polyphyletic, but the branching patterns of gyrB and 16S rRNA gene trees were not congruent. Enterobacter aerogenes was grouped with Klebsiella pneumoniae on the gyrB phylogenetic tree, which supports that this species could be transferred to the Klebsiella genus. Unfortunately, 16S rRNA and gyrB phylogenetic trees gave conflicting evolutionary relationships for Citrobacter freundii because of its unusual gyrB evolutionary process. gyrB lateral gene transfer was suspected for Hafnia alvei. Saturation of gyrB genes was observed by the pairwise comparison of Proteus spp., Providencia alcalifaciens and Morganella morganii sequences. Depending on their level of variability, 16S rRNA gene sequences were useful for describing phylogenetic relationships between distantly related Enterobacteriaceae, whereas gyrB sequence comparison was useful for inferring intra- and some intergeneric relationships.
URL: 11931166
Ref #: 12921
Author(s): Mollet,C.;Drancourt,M.;Raoult,D.
Journal: Mol Microbiol
Title: rpoB sequence analysis as a novel basis for bacterial identification
Volume: 26
Page(s): 1005-11
Year: 1998
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF008577 GENBANK/AF008579 GENBANK/AF008581 GENBANK/AF008582 GENBANK/U77434 GENBANK/U77435 GENBANK/U77436 GENBANK/U77437 GENBANK/U77438 GENBANK/U77439 GENBANK/U77440 GENBANK/U77441 GENBANK/U77443 GENBANK/U77445 GENBANK/U77446 GENBANK/U77447 GENBANK/U77448 GENBANK/U77449 GENBANK/U77450 GENBANK/U77451 GENBANK/U77452 GENBANK/U77453 GENBANK/U78182 GENBANK/U78183 GENBANK/X13854 DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/*genetics Databases, Factual Enterobacteriaceae/genetics Evolution, Molecular RNA, Ribosomal, 16S *Sequence Analysis, DNA Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: Comparison of the sequences of conserved genes, most commonly those encoding 16S rRNA, is used for bacterial genotypic identification. Among some taxa, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, variation within this gene does not allow confident species identification. We investigated the usefulness of RNA polymerase beta-subunit encoding gene (rpoB) sequences as an alternative tool for universal bacterial genotypic identification. We generated a database of partial rpoB for 14 Enterobacteriaceae species and then assessed the intra- and interspecies divergence between the rpoB and the 16S rRNA genes by pairwise comparisons. We found that levels of divergence between the rpoB sequences of different strains were markedly higher than those between their 16S rRNA genes. This higher discriminatory power was further confirmed by assigning 20 blindly selected clinical isolates to the correct enteric species on the basis of rpoB sequence comparison. Comparison of rpoB sequences from Enterobacteriaceae was also used as the basis for their phylogenetic analysis and demonstrated the genus Klebsiella to be polyphyletic. The trees obtained with rpoB were more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Enterobacteriaceae than those obtained with 16S rRNA. These data indicate that rpoB is a powerful identification tool, which may be useful for universal bacterial identification.
URL: 98086106
Ref #: 13697
Author(s): Dauga,C.
Journal: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol
Title: Evolution of the gyrB gene and the molecular phylogeny of Enterobacteriaceae: a model molecule for molecular systematic studies
Volume: 52
Page(s): 531-47
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AJ300528 GENBANK/AJ300529 GENBANK/AJ300530 GENBANK/AJ300531 GENBANK/AJ300532 GENBANK/AJ300533 GENBANK/AJ300534 GENBANK/AJ300535 GENBANK/AJ300536 GENBANK/AJ300537 GENBANK/AJ300538 GENBANK/AJ300539 GENBANK/AJ300540 GENBANK/AJ300541 GENBANK/AJ300542 GENBANK/AJ300543 GENBANK/AJ300544 GENBANK/AJ300545 GENBANK/AJ300546 GENBANK/AJ300547 GENBANK/AJ300548 GENBANK/AJ300549 GENBANK/AJ300550 GENBANK/AJ300551 GENBANK/AJ300552 GENBANK/AJ300553 GENBANK/AJ300554 Comparative Study DNA Gyrase/*genetics Enterobacteriaceae/*classification/genetics Evolution, Molecular Genes, rRNA Molecular Sequence Data Phenotype RNA, Bacterial/chemistry RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/chemistry
Remarks: Phylogenetic trees showing the evolutionary relatedness of Enterobacteriaceae based upon gyrB and 16S rRNA genes were compared. Congruence among trees of these molecules indicates that the genomes of these species are not completely mosaic and that molecular systematic studies can be carried out. Phylogenetic trees based on gyrB sequences appeared to be more reliable at determining relationships among Serratia species than trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. gyrB sequences from Serratia species formed a monophyletic group validated by significant bootstrap values. Serratia fonticola had the most deeply branching gyrB sequence in the Serratia monophyletic group, which was consistent with its atypical phenotypic characteristics. Klebsiella and Enterobacter genera seemed to be polyphyletic, but the branching patterns of gyrB and 16S rRNA gene trees were not congruent. Enterobacter aerogenes was grouped with Klebsiella pneumoniae on the gyrB phylogenetic tree, which supports that this species could be transferred to the Klebsiella genus. Unfortunately, 16S rRNA and gyrB phylogenetic trees gave conflicting evolutionary relationships for Citrobacter freundii because of its unusual gyrB evolutionary process. gyrB lateral gene transfer was suspected for Hafnia alvei. Saturation of gyrB genes was observed by the pairwise comparison of Proteus spp., Providencia alcalifaciens and Morganella morganii sequences. Depending on their level of variability, 16S rRNA gene sequences were useful for describing phylogenetic relationships between distantly related Enterobacteriaceae, whereas gyrB sequence comparison was useful for inferring intra- and some intergeneric relationships.
URL: 21928128
Ref #: 1300
Author(s): Skerman,V.B.D.;McGowan,V.;Sneath,P.H.A.(ed)
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.
Volume: 30
Page(s): 225-420
Year: 1980
Ref #: 6924
Author(s): DeutschesInstitutfürNormungDIN.NormenausschußMedizin(NAMed)
Title: DIN 58959-7. Qualitätsmanagement in der medizinischen Mikrobiologie. Teil 7: Allgemeine Anforderungen an das Mitführen von Kontrollstämmen. Beiblatt 2: ATCC- und DSM-Nummern häufig verwendeter Kontrollstämme.
Year: 1997
Data: (ATCC 29906) Type strain / ATCC in 1986
Accession Date: 01/01/1986
Authority: Hauser 1885 (AL)
Depositor: ATCC
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S2381 (Proteus mirabilis Hauser 1885) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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