Culture Collections

Bacteria and Mycoplasmas detail

Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety





Bacteria Collection: Rhodococcus hoagii

NCTC Number: NCTC 1621
Current Name: Rhodococcus hoagii
Original Strain Reference: Foal
Other Collection No: ATCC 25729; ATCC 6939; CCUG 892; CIP 54.72; DSM 20307; DSM 43349 (historical number); HAMBI 2061; JCM 1311; JCM 3209; LMG 18452; NBRC 101255; NBRC 14956 (historical number); NRRL B-16538; VKM Ac-953; WDCM 00028
Previous Catalogue Name: Rhodococcus equi
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Nocardiaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: Nutrient agar, 24-48 hours, 37°C, aerobic
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS1201844
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|X80614|DSM20307T|R.equi 16S rDNA.| tcctggctcaggacg... >gb|AY262301|ATCC 6939|Rhodococcus equi clone D1 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence.| tggagagtttgatcc... >gb|AF536492|DSM 20307|Rhodococcus equi strain DSM 20307 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenicspacer, complete sequence.| aaggagcatctcccc... >gb|AF536491|DSM 20307|Rhodococcus equi strain DSM 20307 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenicspacer, complete sequence.| aaggagcatctcccc... >gb|X80614|TYPE STRAIN: DSM20307|Rhodococcus equi 16S rRNA gene, strain DSM20307T.| tcctggctcaggacg... >gb|X80603|TYPE STRAIN: ATCC 6939|Rhodococcus equi 16S rRNA gene, strain ATCC 6939T.| acgaacgctggcggc... >gb|AF490539|DSM 20307T|Rhodococcus equi strain DSM 20307T 16S ribosomal RNA gene, completesequence.| gacgaacgctggcgg...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AF536492|DSM 20307|Rhodococcus equi strain DSM 20307 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenicspacer, complete sequence.| aaggagcatctcccc... >gb|AF536491|DSM 20307|Rhodococcus equi strain DSM 20307 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenicspacer, complete sequence.| aaggagcatctcccc... >gb|AJ549080|TYPE STRAIN: DSM 20307T|Rhodococcus equi partial 23S rRNA gene, type strain DSM 20307T.| ccgaatgaccaaggg... >gb|AJ549079|TYPE STRAIN: DSM 20307T|Rhodococcus equi 23S rRNA gene, type strain DSM 20307T.| ccttgaaagagtgcg...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AB014110|IFO 14956|Rhodococcus equi gyrB gene for DNA gyrase B subunit, partial cds,strain IFO 14956.| tccgacgcctacgcg...
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 65545
Author(s): Ruimy,R.;Boiron,P.;Boivin,V.;Christen,R.
Journal: FEMS Microbiol Lett
Title: A phylogeny of the genus Nocardia deduced from the analysis of small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences, including transfer of Nocardia amarae to the genus Gordona as Gordona amarae comb. nov
Volume: 123
Page(s): 261-7
Year: 1995
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80591 GENBANK/X80592 GENBANK/X80593 GENBANK/X80594 GENBANK/X80595 GENBANK/X80596 GENBANK/X80597 GENBANK/X80598 GENBANK/X80599 GENBANK/X80600 GENBANK/X80601 GENBANK/X80602 GENBANK/X80603 GENBANK/X80604 GENBANK/X80605 DNA, Bacterial/*genetics DNA, Ribosomal/*genetics Molecular Sequence Data Nocardia/classification/*genetics *Phylogeny Rhodococcus/classification Sequence Analysis, DNA
Remarks: According to phylogenetic analyses of nearly complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences, the genus Nocardia should not comprise the two species Nocardia petroleophila and Nocardia amarae. N. amarae should be reassigned to the genus Gordona as Gordona amarae. All of the other Nocardia species form a monophyletic unit, closely related to species of the genus Rhodococcus. It is proposed to revive the name 'CMN' to comprise the genera Corynebacterium, Tsukamurella, Mycobacterium, Gordona, Rhodococcus and Nocardia that form a well identified and monophyletic unit. They are all characterized by a cell wall chemotype IV with mycolic acids.
URL: 7545965
Ref #: 95479
Author(s): Mitterer,G.;Huber,M.;Leidinger,E.;Kirisits,C.;Lubitz,W.;Mueller,M.W.;Schmidt,W.M.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Microarray-based identification of bacteria in clinical samples by solid-phase PCR amplification of 23S ribosomal DNA sequences
Volume: 42
Page(s): 1048-57
Year: 2004
Keyword(s): Abortion, Veterinary/microbiology Animals Bacteria/*genetics/*isolation & purification Base Sequence DNA Primers DNA, Bacterial/genetics/isolation & purification DNA, Ribosomal/*genetics/isolation & purification Female Horses *Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods Pregnancy Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/microbiology/veterinary RNA, Bacterial/genetics/isolation & purification RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics/isolation & purification
Remarks: The rapid identification of the bacteria in clinical samples is important for patient management and antimicrobial therapy. We describe a DNA microarray-based PCR approach for the quick detection and identification of bacteria from cervical swab specimens from mares. This on-chip PCR method combines the amplification of a variable region of bacterial 23S ribosomal DNA and the simultaneous sequence-specific detection on a solid phase. The solid phase contains bacterial species-specific primers covalently bound to a glass support. During the solid-phase amplification reaction the polymerase elongates perfectly matched primers and incorporates biotin-labeled nucleotides. The reaction products are visualized by streptavidin-cyanine 5 staining, followed by fluorescence scanning. This procedure successfully identified from pure cultures 22 bacteria that are common causes of abortion and sterility in mares. Using the on-chip PCR method, we also tested 21 cervical swab specimens from mares for the presence of pathogenic bacteria and compared the results with those of conventional bacteriological culture methods. Our method correctly identified the bacteria in 12 cervical swab samples, 8 of which contained more than one bacterial species. Due to the higher sensitivity of the on-chip PCR, this method identified bacteria in five cervical swab samples which were not detected by the conventional identification procedure. Our results show that this method will have great potential to be incorporated into the routine microbiology laboratory.
URL: 15004052
Ref #: 65647
Author(s): Patel,J.B.;Wallace RJ,J.r.;Brown-Elliott,B.A.;Taylor,T.;Imperatrice,C.;Leonard,D.G.;Wilson,R.W.;Mann,L.;Jost,K.C.;Nachamkin,I.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Sequence-based identification of aerobic actinomycetes
Volume: 42
Page(s): 2530-40
Year: 2004
Keyword(s): Actinobacteria/classification/genetics/*isolation & purification Aerobiosis DNA, Ribosomal/chemistry Nocardia/genetics/isolation & purification Phylogeny RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics Sequence Analysis, DNA
Remarks: We investigated the utility of 500-bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing for identifying clinically significant species of aerobic actinomycetes. A total of 28 reference strains and 71 clinical isolates that included members of the genera Streptomyces, Gordonia, and Tsukamurella and 10 taxa of Nocardia were studied. Methods of nonsequencing analyses included growth and biochemical analysis, PCR-restriction enzyme analysis of the 439-bp Telenti fragment of the 65 hsp gene, susceptibility testing, and, for selected isolates, high-performance liquid chromatography. Many of the isolates were included in prior taxonomic studies. Sequencing of Nocardia species revealed that members of the group were generally most closely related to the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strains. However, the sequences of Nocardia transvalensis, N. otitidiscaviarum, and N. nova isolates were highly variable; and it is likely that each of these species contains multiple species. We propose that these three species be designated complexes until they are more taxonomically defined. The sequences of several taxa did not match any recognized species. Among other aerobic actinomycetes, each group most closely resembled the associated reference strain, but with some divergence. The study demonstrates the ability of partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify members of the aerobic actinomycetes, but the study also shows that a high degree of sequence divergence exists within many species and that many taxa within the Nocardia spp. are unnamed at present. A major unresolved issue is the type strain of N. asteroides, as the present one (ATCC 19247), chosen before the availability of molecular analysis, does not represent any of the common taxa associated with clinical nocardiosis.
URL: 15184431
Ref #: 12521
Author(s): Ruimy,R.;Boiron,P.;Boivin,V.;Christen,R.
Journal: FEMS Microbiol Lett
Title: A phylogeny of the genus Nocardia deduced from the analysis of small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences, including transfer of Nocardia amarae to the genus Gordona as Gordona amarae comb. nov
Volume: 123
Page(s): 261-7
Year: 1995
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80591 GENBANK/X80592 GENBANK/X80593 GENBANK/X80594 GENBANK/X80595 GENBANK/X80596 GENBANK/X80597 GENBANK/X80598 GENBANK/X80599 GENBANK/X80600 GENBANK/X80601 GENBANK/X80602 GENBANK/X80603 GENBANK/X80604 GENBANK/X80605 DNA, Bacterial/*genetics DNA, Ribosomal/*genetics Molecular Sequence Data Nocardia/classification/*genetics *Phylogeny Rhodococcus/classification Sequence Analysis, DNA Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: According to phylogenetic analyses of nearly complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences, the genus Nocardia should not comprise the two species Nocardia petroleophila and Nocardia amarae. N. amarae should be reassigned to the genus Gordona as Gordona amarae. All of the other Nocardia species form a monophyletic unit, closely related to species of the genus Rhodococcus. It is proposed to revive the name 'CMN' to comprise the genera Corynebacterium, Tsukamurella, Mycobacterium, Gordona, Rhodococcus and Nocardia that form a well identified and monophyletic unit. They are all characterized by a cell wall chemotype IV with mycolic acids.
URL: 95080630
Ref #: 1300
Author(s): Skerman,V.B.D.;McGowan,V.;Sneath,P.H.A.(ed)
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.
Volume: 30
Page(s): 225-420
Year: 1980
Ref #: 1303
Author(s): Collins,M.D.;Pirouz,T.;Goodfellow,M.;Minnikin,D.E.
Journal: J. Gen. Microbiol.
Title: Distribution of menaquinones in actinomycetes and corynebacteria.
Volume: 100
Page(s): 221-230
Year: 1977
Ref #: 1304
Author(s): Yamada,Y.;Inouye,G.;Tahara,Y.;Kondo,K.
Journal: J. Gen. Appl. Microbiol.
Title: The menaquinone system in the classification of coryneform and nocardioform bacteria and related organisms.
Volume: 22
Page(s): 203-214
Year: 1976
Ref #: 1305
Author(s): Suzuki,K.;Kaneko,T.;Komagata,K.
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Deoxyribonucleic acid homologies among coryneform bacteria.
Volume: 31
Page(s): 131-138
Year: 1981
Ref #: 419
Author(s): Yamada,K.;Komagata,K.
Journal: J. Gen. Appl. Microbiol.
Title: Taxonomic studies on coryneform bacteria. III. DNA base composition of coryneform bacteria.
Volume: 16
Page(s): 215-244
Year: 1970
Ref #: 885
Author(s): Fiedler,F.;Schleifer,K.H.;Cziharz,B.;Interschick,E.;Kandler,O.
Journal: Publ. Fac. Sci. Univ. J. E. Purkyñe, Brno
Title: Murein types in arthrobacter, brevibacteria, corynebacteria and microbacteria.
Volume: 47
Page(s): 111-122
Year: 1970
Data: (ATCC 6939) H. Magnusson, Malmo in 1923 / Abscess of lung, foal in 1922 / Magnusson, H. (1923) Arch. wiss. prakt. Tierheilk. 50, 22 / Magnusson, H. (1938) Vet. Rec. 50, 1459 / Woodroofe, G. M. (1950) Aust. J. exp. Biol. med. Sci. 28, 399 / CAMP test: McLauchlin, J. (1987) J. appl. Bact. 63, 1
Accession Date: 04/02/2003
Authority: (Magnusson 1923) Goodfellow and Alderson 1977 (AL)
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S2555 (Rhodococcus equi (magnusson 1923) goodfellow and alderson 1977) - Date of change: 16/06/2007 by NCTCUp to 16/06/2007: ? (NCTC 1621) - Date of change: 04/02/2003
Other: CAMP test: Listeria
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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The Culture Collections hold cell cultures, bacteria, fungi and virus strains from worldwide sources. Our scientists ensure that the identification of the cultures is correct and they remain unchanged from when they are first deposited with the Collection. Nevertheless, some of the data we provide about the cultures is supplied by the person depositing the strains and, although we have multiple checking procedures in place, we cannot always verify all their data. Please note that the Culture Collections cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies in the data provided by the depositors.

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