Culture Collections

Bacteria and Mycoplasmas detail

Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety





Bacteria Collection: Mycobacterium microti

NCTC Number: NCTC 8710
Current Name: Mycobacterium microti
Original Strain Reference: LV 285/303
Other Collection No: ATCC 19422; LV 285/303
Previous Catalogue Name: Mycobacterium microti
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Mycobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 3
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: dorset egg medium,37, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, aerobic
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AF480584|ATCC 19422|Mycobacterium microti 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence.| gacgaacgctggcgg...
Bibliography: WELLS A Q 1937 LANCET 2 1221
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95496
Author(s): Turenne,C.Y.;Tschetter,L.;Wolfe,J.;Kabani,A.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Necessity of quality-controlled 16S rRNA gene sequence databases: identifying nontuberculous Mycobacterium species
Volume: 39
Page(s): 3637-48
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): *Databases, Nucleic Acid *Genes, rRNA Humans Internet Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium Infections/*microbiology Phylogeny Quality Control RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Reference Standards *Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: The use of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) provides a faster and better ability to accurately identify them in addition to contributing significantly in the discovery of new species. Despite their associated problems, many rely on the use of public sequence databases for sequence comparisons. To best evaluate the taxonomic status of NTM species submitted to our reference laboratory, we have created a 16S rRNA sequence database by sequencing 121 American Type Culture Collection strains encompassing 92 species of mycobacteria, and have also included chosen unique mycobacterial sequences from public sequence repositories. In addition, the Ribosomal Differentiation of Medical Microorganisms (RIDOM) service has made freely available on the Internet mycobacterial identification by 16S rRNA analysis. We have evaluated 122 clinical NTM species using our database, comparing >1,400 bp of the 16S gene, and the RIDOM database, comparing approximately 440 bp. The breakdown of analysis was as follows: 61 strains had a sequence with 100% similarity to the type strain of an established species, 19 strains showed a 1- to 5-bp divergence from an established species, 11 strains had sequences corresponding to uncharacterized strain sequences in public databases, and 31 strains represented unique sequences. Our experience with analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of patient strains has shown that clear-cut results are not the rule. As many clinical, research, and environmental laboratories currently employ 16S-based identification of bacteria, including mycobacteria, a freely available quality-controlled database such as that provided by RIDOM is essential to accurately identify species or detect true sequence variations leading to the discovery of new species.
URL: 11574585
Ref #: 13151
Author(s): Turenne,C.Y.;Tschetter,L.;Wolfe,J.;Kabani,A.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Necessity of quality-controlled 16S rRNA gene sequence databases: identifying nontuberculous Mycobacterium species
Volume: 39
Page(s): 3637-48
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): *Databases, Nucleic Acid *Genes, rRNA Human Internet Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium Infections/*microbiology Phylogeny Quality Control RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Reference Standards *Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: The use of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) provides a faster and better ability to accurately identify them in addition to contributing significantly in the discovery of new species. Despite their associated problems, many rely on the use of public sequence databases for sequence comparisons. To best evaluate the taxonomic status of NTM species submitted to our reference laboratory, we have created a 16S rRNA sequence database by sequencing 121 American Type Culture Collection strains encompassing 92 species of mycobacteria, and have also included chosen unique mycobacterial sequences from public sequence repositories. In addition, the Ribosomal Differentiation of Medical Microorganisms (RIDOM) service has made freely available on the Internet mycobacterial identification by 16S rRNA analysis. We have evaluated 122 clinical NTM species using our database, comparing >1,400 bp of the 16S gene, and the RIDOM database, comparing approximately 440 bp. The breakdown of analysis was as follows: 61 strains had a sequence with 100% similarity to the type strain of an established species, 19 strains showed a 1- to 5-bp divergence from an established species, 11 strains had sequences corresponding to uncharacterized strain sequences in public databases, and 31 strains represented unique sequences. Our experience with analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of patient strains has shown that clear-cut results are not the rule. As many clinical, research, and environmental laboratories currently employ 16S-based identification of bacteria, including mycobacteria, a freely available quality-controlled database such as that provided by RIDOM is essential to accurately identify species or detect true sequence variations leading to the discovery of new species.
URL: 21458757
Data: (ATCC 19422) Type strain / A. Q. Wells, Oxford in 1950 / Vole bacillus / Wells, A. Q. (1937) Lancet ii, 1221
Accession Date: 01/01/1950
History: WELLS A Q,SIR WILLIAM DUNN SCHOOL OF PATHOLOGY,OXFORD
Authority: Reed 1957 (AL)
Depositor: WELLS A Q
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S1964 (Mycobacterium microti Reed 1957) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

Additional Information

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The Culture Collections hold cell cultures, bacteria, fungi and virus strains from worldwide sources. Our scientists ensure that the identification of the cultures is correct and they remain unchanged from when they are first deposited with the Collection. Nevertheless, some of the data we provide about the cultures is supplied by the person depositing the strains and, although we have multiple checking procedures in place, we cannot always verify all their data. Please note that the Culture Collections cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies in the data provided by the depositors.

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Available Formats

Ampoule (Bacteria)
Bacterial DNA - 2µg

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