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Bacteria Collection: Providencia stuartii

NCTC Number: NCTC 11800
Current Name: Providencia stuartii
Original Strain Reference: CDC 2896-68
Other Collection No: ATCC 29914; CDC 2896-68; DSM 4539
Previous Catalogue Name: Providencia stuartii
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Enterobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: Nutrient agar, 24 hours, 37°C, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,37, facultative anaerobe
Isolated From: human
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS513146
Annotated Genome: ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/project/pathogens/NCTC3000/d...
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AF008581|ATCC 29914T|Providencia stuartii 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence.| tgatcctggctcaga...
Miscellaneous Sequence Data: >gb|AY370859|ATCC 29914|Providencia stuartii strain ATCC 29914 gyrase B (gyrB) gene,partial cds.| aaagtctccggcggt...
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 95511
Author(s): Mollet,C.;Drancourt,M.;Raoult,D.
Journal: Mol Microbiol
Title: rpoB sequence analysis as a novel basis for bacterial identification
Volume: 26
Page(s): 1005-11
Year: 1998
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF008577 GENBANK/AF008579 GENBANK/AF008581 GENBANK/AF008582 GENBANK/U77434 GENBANK/U77435 GENBANK/U77436 GENBANK/U77437 GENBANK/U77438 GENBANK/U77439 GENBANK/U77440 GENBANK/U77441 GENBANK/U77443 GENBANK/U77445 GENBANK/U77446 GENBANK/U77447 GENBANK/U77448 GENBANK/U77449 GENBANK/U77450 GENBANK/U77451 GENBANK/U77452 GENBANK/U77453 GENBANK/U78182 GENBANK/U78183 GENBANK/X13854 DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/*genetics Databases, Factual Enterobacteriaceae/genetics Evolution, Molecular RNA, Ribosomal, 16S *Sequence Analysis, DNA
Remarks: Comparison of the sequences of conserved genes, most commonly those encoding 16S rRNA, is used for bacterial genotypic identification. Among some taxa, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, variation within this gene does not allow confident species identification. We investigated the usefulness of RNA polymerase beta-subunit encoding gene (rpoB) sequences as an alternative tool for universal bacterial genotypic identification. We generated a database of partial rpoB for 14 Enterobacteriaceae species and then assessed the intra- and interspecies divergence between the rpoB and the 16S rRNA genes by pairwise comparisons. We found that levels of divergence between the rpoB sequences of different strains were markedly higher than those between their 16S rRNA genes. This higher discriminatory power was further confirmed by assigning 20 blindly selected clinical isolates to the correct enteric species on the basis of rpoB sequence comparison. Comparison of rpoB sequences from Enterobacteriaceae was also used as the basis for their phylogenetic analysis and demonstrated the genus Klebsiella to be polyphyletic. The trees obtained with rpoB were more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Enterobacteriaceae than those obtained with 16S rRNA. These data indicate that rpoB is a powerful identification tool, which may be useful for universal bacterial identification.
URL: 9426137
Ref #: 43181
Author(s): Delmas,J.;Breysse,F.;Devulder,G.;Flandrois,J.P.;Chomarat,M.
Journal: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis
Title: Rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae by sequencing DNA gyrase subunit B encoding gene
Volume: 55
Page(s): 263-8
Year: 2006
Keyword(s): Bacterial Typing Techniques/*methods DNA Gyrase/*genetics Enterobacteriaceae/enzymology/genetics/*isolation & purification Genotype Humans Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods
Remarks: Real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to characterize a 506-bp-long DNA fragment internal to the gyrB gene (gyrBint). The sequences obtained from 32 Enterobacteriaceae-type strains and those available in the Genbank nucleotide sequence database (n = 24) were used as a database to identify 240 clinical enterobacteria isolates. Sequence analysis of the gyrBint fragment of 240 strains showed that gyrBint constitutes a discriminative target sequence to differentiate between Enterobacteriaceae species. Comparison of these identifications with those obtained by phenotypic methods (Vitek 1 system and/or Rapid ID 32E; bioMerieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) revealed discrepancies essentially with genera Citrobacter and Enterobacter. Most of the strains identified as Enterobacter cloacae by phenotypic methods were identified as Enterobacter hormaechei strains by gyrBint sequencing. The direct sequencing of gyrBint would be useful as a complementary tool in the identification of clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.
URL: 16626902
Ref #: 12921
Author(s): Mollet,C.;Drancourt,M.;Raoult,D.
Journal: Mol Microbiol
Title: rpoB sequence analysis as a novel basis for bacterial identification
Volume: 26
Page(s): 1005-11
Year: 1998
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF008577 GENBANK/AF008579 GENBANK/AF008581 GENBANK/AF008582 GENBANK/U77434 GENBANK/U77435 GENBANK/U77436 GENBANK/U77437 GENBANK/U77438 GENBANK/U77439 GENBANK/U77440 GENBANK/U77441 GENBANK/U77443 GENBANK/U77445 GENBANK/U77446 GENBANK/U77447 GENBANK/U77448 GENBANK/U77449 GENBANK/U77450 GENBANK/U77451 GENBANK/U77452 GENBANK/U77453 GENBANK/U78182 GENBANK/U78183 GENBANK/X13854 DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/*genetics Databases, Factual Enterobacteriaceae/genetics Evolution, Molecular RNA, Ribosomal, 16S *Sequence Analysis, DNA Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Remarks: Comparison of the sequences of conserved genes, most commonly those encoding 16S rRNA, is used for bacterial genotypic identification. Among some taxa, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, variation within this gene does not allow confident species identification. We investigated the usefulness of RNA polymerase beta-subunit encoding gene (rpoB) sequences as an alternative tool for universal bacterial genotypic identification. We generated a database of partial rpoB for 14 Enterobacteriaceae species and then assessed the intra- and interspecies divergence between the rpoB and the 16S rRNA genes by pairwise comparisons. We found that levels of divergence between the rpoB sequences of different strains were markedly higher than those between their 16S rRNA genes. This higher discriminatory power was further confirmed by assigning 20 blindly selected clinical isolates to the correct enteric species on the basis of rpoB sequence comparison. Comparison of rpoB sequences from Enterobacteriaceae was also used as the basis for their phylogenetic analysis and demonstrated the genus Klebsiella to be polyphyletic. The trees obtained with rpoB were more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Enterobacteriaceae than those obtained with 16S rRNA. These data indicate that rpoB is a powerful identification tool, which may be useful for universal bacterial identification.
URL: 98086106
Data: (ATCC 29914) Type strain / ATCC in 1984 / CDC Atlanta / Colorado State Health Department / Human, 1968 Biogroup 5
Accession Date: 01/01/1984
History: COLORADO STATE HEALTH DEPT - CDC - ATCC
Authority: (Buttiaux et al. 1954) Ewing 1962 (AL)
Depositor: ATCC
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S2395 (Providencia stuartii (Buttiaux et al. 1954) Ewing 1962) - Date of change: 5/02/2003
Biosafety Responsibility: It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country

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