Culture Collections

Bacteria and Mycoplasmas detail

Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety





Bacteria Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. chelonae

NCTC Number: NCTC 946
Current Name: Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. chelonae
Original Strain Reference: Friedmann
Other Collection No: ATCC 35752; DSM 43804; FRIEDMANN; IMET 10609; JCM 6388; TMC 1544
Previous Catalogue Name: Mycobacterium chelonei subsp. chelonei
Other Names: MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS, (ZOPF 1883) LEHMANN AND NEUMANN 1896
Type Strain: Yes
Family: Mycobacteriaceae
Hazard Group (ACDP): 2
Release Restrictions: Terms & Conditions of Supply of Microbial Pathogens: Safety
Conditions for growth on solid media: Columbia blood agar, 48-72 hours, 30°C, aerobic
Conditions for growth on liquid media: nutrient broth,30, aerobic
Isolated From: reptile;tubercle, tortoise
Whole Genome Sequence: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERS1211133
16S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AF480594|ATCC 35752|Mycobacterium chelonae 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence.| gacgaacgctggcgg... >gb|Y13911|ATCC 35752T|Mycobacterium chelonae murA and 16S rRNA gene.| ttcgaggcccggttc... >gb|X82236|ATCC 35752|M.chelonae 16S rRNA gene.| gggtgatctgccctg... >gb|AY498739|ATCC 35752|Mycobacterium chelonae 16S ribosomal RNA gene and 16S-23Sintergenic spacer, partial sequence.| cctttctaaggagca... >gb|AF059852|ATCC35752|Mycobacterium chelonae strain ATCC35752 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs)gene, partial sequence.| agtcgaacggaaagg...
23S rRNA Gene Sequence: >gb|AY498739|ATCC 35752|Mycobacterium chelonae 16S ribosomal RNA gene and 16S-23Sintergenic spacer, partial sequence.| cctttctaaggagca...
Extended Bibliography: showhide Show bibliography
Ref #: 61112
Author(s): Springer,B.;Bottger,E.C.;Kirschner,P.;Wallace RJ,J.r.
Journal: Int J Syst Bacteriol
Title: Phylogeny of the Mycobacterium chelonae-like organism based on partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and proposal of Mycobacterium mucogenicum sp. nov
Volume: 45
Page(s): 262-7
Year: 1995
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80771 GENBANK/X80772 GENBANK/X80773 GENBANK/X82235 GENBANK/X82236 Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial/*genetics Genes, Bacterial Humans Molecular Sequence Data Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics/physiology Mycobacterium chelonae/classification/genetics Phylogeny RNA, Bacterial/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Sequence Analysis Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Water Microbiology
Remarks: The Mycobacterium chelonae-like organism (MCLO) is a recently described member of the Mycobacterium fortuitum complex which causes posttraumatic skin infections and catheter sepsis. This taxon is a distinct group biochemically and has a unique mycolic acid profile as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Its phylogenetic relationships to other mycobacteria, however, have not been studied previously. We sequenced 1,062 bp of the 16S rRNA genes from three MCLO strains obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and compared our results with the sequences of previously described taxa of rapidly growing and slowly growing mycobacteria. Two biochemically typical strains (ATCC 49650T [T = type strain] and ATCC 49651) had identical sequences, while the sequence of a biochemically atypical strain (ATCC 49649) differed by 4 bp from the sequence of the two typical strains. The Hamming distances between these MCLO strains and related rapidly growing mycobacteria are comparable to the Hamming distances among taxa of rapidly growing mycobacteria established as species by DNA-DNA hybridization. We propose the name Mycobacterium mucogenicum sp. nov. for this new taxon because of the highly mucoid nature of most isolates on solid media.
URL: 7537060
Ref #: 95518
Author(s): Gingeras,T.R.;Ghandour,G.;Wang,E.;Berno,A.;Small,P.M.;Drobniewski,F.;Alland,D.;Desmond,E.;Holodniy,M.;Drenkow,J.
Journal: Genome Res
Title: Simultaneous genotyping and species identification using hybridization pattern recognition analysis of generic Mycobacterium DNA arrays
Volume: 8
Page(s): 435-48
Year: 1998
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AF059766 GENBANK/AF059767 GENBANK/AF059768 GENBANK/AF059769 GENBANK/AF059770 GENBANK/AF059771 GENBANK/AF059772 GENBANK/AF059773 GENBANK/AF059774 GENBANK/AF059775 GENBANK/AF059776 GENBANK/AF059777 GENBANK/AF059778 GENBANK/AF059779 GENBANK/AF059780 GENBANK/AF059781 GENBANK/AF059782 GENBANK/AF059783 GENBANK/AF059784 GENBANK/AF059785 GENBANK/AF059786 GENBANK/AF059787 GENBANK/AF059788 GENBANK/AF059789 GENBANK/AF059790 GENBANK/AF059791 GENBANK/AF059792 GENBANK/AF059793 GENBANK/AF059794 GENBANK/AF059795 Alleles DNA, Bacterial/*analysis DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics Drug Resistance, Microbial/genetics Gene Frequency Genes, Bacterial Genotype Molecular Sequence Data Mutagenesis Mycobacterium/drug effects/*genetics/*isolation & purification Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects/genetics Nucleic Acid Hybridization/methods Oligonucleotides/analysis Polymorphism, Genetic RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics Rifampin/pharmacology Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: High-density oligonucleotide arrays can be used to rapidly examine large amounts of DNA sequence in a high throughput manner. An array designed to determine the specific nucleotide sequence of 705 bp of the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis accurately detected rifampin resistance associated with mutations of 44 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence diversity in 121 Mycobacterial isolates (comprised of 10 species) was examined by both conventional dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the rpoB and 16S genes and by analysis of the rpoB oligonucleotide array hybridization patterns. Species identification for each of the isolates was similar irrespective of whether 16S sequence, rpoB sequence, or the pattern of rpoB hybridization was used. However, for several species, the number of alleles in the 16S and rpoB gene sequences provided discordant estimates of the genetic diversity within a species. In addition to confirming the array's intended utility for sequencing the region of M. tuberculosis that confers rifampin resistance, this work demonstrates that this array can identify the species of nontuberculous Mycobacteria. This demonstrates the general point that DNA microarrays that sequence important genomic regions (such as drug resistance or pathogenicity islands) can simultaneously identify species and provide some insight into the organism's population structure.
URL: 9582189
Ref #: 60037
Author(s): Hamid,M.E.;Roth,A.;Landt,O.;Kroppenstedt,R.M.;Goodfellow,M.;Mauch,H.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Differentiation between Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense strains based on 16S-23S ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer sequences
Volume: 40
Page(s): 707-11
Year: 2002
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AJ291580 GENBANK/AJ291581 GENBANK/AJ291582 GENBANK/AJ291583 GENBANK/AJ291584 GENBANK/AJ291585 GENBANK/AJ291586 GENBANK/AJ291587 GENBANK/AJ291588 GENBANK/AJ291589 GENBANK/AJ291590 GENBANK/AJ291591 GENBANK/AJ291592 GENBANK/AJ291593 GENBANK/AJ291594 GENBANK/AJ291595 GENBANK/AJ291596 GENBANK/AJ291597 GENBANK/AJ291598 GENBANK/AJ291599 GENBANK/AJ291600 GENBANK/Y10384 GENBANK/Y10385 GENBANK/Y11581 GENBANK/Y11582 Animals Base Sequence Cattle Cattle Diseases/*microbiology DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/*genetics Molecular Sequence Data Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium Infections/microbiology/*veterinary Phylogeny Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/*genetics Sequence Analysis, DNA
Remarks: 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequence analyses were performed on Mycobacterium farcinogenes and M. senegalense strains and 26 strains of other rapidly growing mycobacteria to investigate the phylogenetic structure of bovine farcy mycobacteria within the M. fortuitum complex. M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense were indistinguishable in their 5"-end 16S rDNA but showed both considerable interspecies spacer sequence divergence and a high level of intraspecies sequence stability. A rapid detection assay using PCR and hybridization with species-specific probes was developed. The assay was specific among 46 species other than M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense and correctly identified all M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense strains. PCR- and 16S-23S rDNA sequence-based detection will be a valuable approach for diagnosis of the causal agents of African bovine farcy in cattle.
URL: 11826003
Ref #: 95496
Author(s): Turenne,C.Y.;Tschetter,L.;Wolfe,J.;Kabani,A.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Necessity of quality-controlled 16S rRNA gene sequence databases: identifying nontuberculous Mycobacterium species
Volume: 39
Page(s): 3637-48
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): *Databases, Nucleic Acid *Genes, rRNA Humans Internet Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium Infections/*microbiology Phylogeny Quality Control RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Reference Standards *Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: The use of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) provides a faster and better ability to accurately identify them in addition to contributing significantly in the discovery of new species. Despite their associated problems, many rely on the use of public sequence databases for sequence comparisons. To best evaluate the taxonomic status of NTM species submitted to our reference laboratory, we have created a 16S rRNA sequence database by sequencing 121 American Type Culture Collection strains encompassing 92 species of mycobacteria, and have also included chosen unique mycobacterial sequences from public sequence repositories. In addition, the Ribosomal Differentiation of Medical Microorganisms (RIDOM) service has made freely available on the Internet mycobacterial identification by 16S rRNA analysis. We have evaluated 122 clinical NTM species using our database, comparing >1,400 bp of the 16S gene, and the RIDOM database, comparing approximately 440 bp. The breakdown of analysis was as follows: 61 strains had a sequence with 100% similarity to the type strain of an established species, 19 strains showed a 1- to 5-bp divergence from an established species, 11 strains had sequences corresponding to uncharacterized strain sequences in public databases, and 31 strains represented unique sequences. Our experience with analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of patient strains has shown that clear-cut results are not the rule. As many clinical, research, and environmental laboratories currently employ 16S-based identification of bacteria, including mycobacteria, a freely available quality-controlled database such as that provided by RIDOM is essential to accurately identify species or detect true sequence variations leading to the discovery of new species.
URL: 11574585
Ref #: 61305
Author(s): Gonzalez-y-Merchand,J.A.;Garcia,M.J.;Gonzalez-Rico,S.;Colston,M.J.;Cox,R.A.
Journal: J Bacteriol
Title: Strategies used by pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria to synthesize rRNA
Volume: 179
Page(s): 6949-58
Year: 1997
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X99775 GENBANK/X99776 GENBANK/X99777 GENBANK/Y13910 GENBANK/Y13911 Base Sequence Chromosome Mapping Cloning, Molecular DNA, Bacterial/genetics Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial Genes, Bacterial Genome, Bacterial Molecular Sequence Data Molecular Structure Mycobacterium/*genetics/*metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium chelonae/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium fortuitum/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium phlei/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Plasmids Polymerase Chain Reaction *Promoter Regions (Genetics) RNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics RNA, Ribosomal/chemistry/metabolism RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics Ribosomes/*metabolism Sequence Alignment Sequence Analysis, DNA Transcription, Genetic Virulence/genetics *rRNA Operon
Remarks: One rRNA operon of all mycobacteria studied so far is located downstream from a gene thought to code for the enzyme UDP-N-acetylglucosamine carboxyvinyl transferase (UNAcGCT), which is important to cell wall synthesis. This operon has been designated rrnAf for fast-growing mycobacteria and rrnAs for slow growers. We have investigated the upstream sequences and promoter activities of rrnA operons of typical fast growers which also possess a second rrn (rrnBf) operon and of the rrnA operons of the fast growers Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae, which each have a single rrn operon per genome. These fast growers have a common strategy for increasing the efficiency of transcription of their rrnA operons, thereby increasing the cells' potential for ribosome synthesis. This strategy involves the use of multiple (three to five) promoters which may have arisen through successive duplication events. Thus we have identified a hypervariable multiple promoter region (HMPR) located between the UNAcGCT gene and the 16S rRNA coding region. Two promoters, P1 and PCL1, appear to play pivotal roles in mycobacterial rRNA synthesis; they are present in all of the species examined and are the only promoters used for rRNA synthesis by the pathogenic slow growers. P1 is located within the coding region of the UNAcGCT gene, and PCL1 has a characteristic sequence that is related to but distinct from that of the additional promoters. In fast-growing species, P1 and PCL1 produce less than 10% of rRNA transcripts, so the additional promoters found in the HMPR are important in increasing the potential for rRNA synthesis during rapid growth. In contrast, rrnB operons appear to be regulated by a single promoter; because less divergence has taken place, rrnB appears to be younger than rrnA.
URL: 9371439
Ref #: 59154
Author(s): Khan,I.U.;Selvaraju,S.B.;Yadav,J.S.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Method for rapid identification and differentiation of the species of the Mycobacterium chelonae complex based on 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer PCR-restriction analysis
Volume: 43
Page(s): 4466-72
Year: 2005
Keyword(s): GENBANK/AY497531 GENBANK/AY498739 GENBANK/AY498740 *Bacterial Typing Techniques Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial/analysis DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/*analysis Genes, rRNA Humans Molecular Sequence Data Mycobacteria, Atypical/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium chelonae/*classification/genetics Polymerase Chain Reaction/*methods RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 23S/genetics Restriction Mapping/*methods Time Factors
Remarks: Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae complex (MCC), including M. immunogenum, M. chelonae, and M. abscessus, have been associated with nosocomial infections and occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to metalworking fluid (MWF) exposures. In order to minimize these health hazards, an effective and rapid assay for detection of MCC species and differentiation of MCC species from other species of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and from one another is warranted. Here we report such a method, based on the variable 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Mycobacterium genus-specific primers derived from highly conserved sequences in the ITS region and the flanking 16S rRNA gene were used. Specificity of the primers was verified using the MCC member species, 11 non-MCC RGM species, 3 slow-growing mycobacterial (SGM) species (two strains each), and 19 field isolates, including 18 MCC isolates (from in-use MWF) and one non-MCC isolate (from reverse osmosis water). The ITS amplicon size of M. immunogenum varied from those of M. chelonae and M. abscessus. Sequencing of the approximately 250-bp-long ITS amplicons of the three MCC member species showed differences in 24 to 34 bases, thereby yielding variable deduced restriction maps. ITS PCR-restriction analysis using the in silico-selected restriction enzyme MaeII or HphI differentiated the three MCC members from one another and from other RGM and SGM species without sequencing. The enzyme MaeII discriminated all three member species; however, HphI could only differentiate M. immunogenum from M. chelonae and M. abscessus. Use of an optimized rapid DNA template preparation step based on direct cell lysis in the PCR tube added to the simplicity and adaptability of the developed assay.
URL: 16145093
Ref #: 13153
Author(s): Springer,B.;Bottger,E.C.;Kirschner,P.;Wallace RJ,J.r.
Journal: Int J Syst Bacteriol
Title: Phylogeny of the Mycobacterium chelonae-like organism based on partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and proposal of Mycobacterium mucogenicum sp. nov
Volume: 45
Page(s): 262-7
Year: 1995
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X80771 GENBANK/X80772 GENBANK/X80773 GENBANK/X82235 GENBANK/X82236 Base Sequence DNA, Bacterial/*genetics Genes, Bacterial Human Molecular Sequence Data Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics/physiology Mycobacterium chelonae/classification/genetics Phylogeny RNA, Bacterial/*genetics RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Sequence Analysis Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid Water Microbiology
Remarks: The Mycobacterium chelonae-like organism (MCLO) is a recently described member of the Mycobacterium fortuitum complex which causes posttraumatic skin infections and catheter sepsis. This taxon is a distinct group biochemically and has a unique mycolic acid profile as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Its phylogenetic relationships to other mycobacteria, however, have not been studied previously. We sequenced 1,062 bp of the 16S rRNA genes from three MCLO strains obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and compared our results with the sequences of previously described taxa of rapidly growing and slowly growing mycobacteria. Two biochemically typical strains (ATCC 49650T [T = type strain] and ATCC 49651) had identical sequences, while the sequence of a biochemically atypical strain (ATCC 49649) differed by 4 bp from the sequence of the two typical strains. The Hamming distances between these MCLO strains and related rapidly growing mycobacteria are comparable to the Hamming distances among taxa of rapidly growing mycobacteria established as species by DNA-DNA hybridization. We propose the name Mycobacterium mucogenicum sp. nov. for this new taxon because of the highly mucoid nature of most isolates on solid media.
URL: 95244308
Ref #: 13152
Author(s): Gonzalez-y-Merchand,J.A.;Garcia,M.J.;Gonzalez-Rico,S.;Colston,M.J.;Cox,R.A.
Journal: J Bacteriol
Title: Strategies used by pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria to synthesize rRNA
Volume: 179
Page(s): 6949-58
Year: 1997
Keyword(s): GENBANK/X99775 GENBANK/X99776 GENBANK/X99777 GENBANK/Y13910 GENBANK/Y13911 Base Sequence Chromosome Mapping Cloning, Molecular Comparative Study DNA, Bacterial/genetics Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial Genes, Bacterial Genome, Bacterial Molecular Sequence Data Molecular Structure Mycobacterium/*genetics/*metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium chelonae/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium fortuitum/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Mycobacterium phlei/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity Plasmids Polymerase Chain Reaction *Promoter Regions (Genetics) RNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics RNA, Ribosomal/chemistry/metabolism RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics Ribosomes/*metabolism Sequence Alignment Sequence Analysis, DNA Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Transcription, Genetic Virulence/genetics *rRNA Operon
Remarks: One rRNA operon of all mycobacteria studied so far is located downstream from a gene thought to code for the enzyme UDP-N-acetylglucosamine carboxyvinyl transferase (UNAcGCT), which is important to cell wall synthesis. This operon has been designated rrnAf for fast-growing mycobacteria and rrnAs for slow growers. We have investigated the upstream sequences and promoter activities of rrnA operons of typical fast growers which also possess a second rrn (rrnBf) operon and of the rrnA operons of the fast growers Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae, which each have a single rrn operon per genome. These fast growers have a common strategy for increasing the efficiency of transcription of their rrnA operons, thereby increasing the cells' potential for ribosome synthesis. This strategy involves the use of multiple (three to five) promoters which may have arisen through successive duplication events. Thus we have identified a hypervariable multiple promoter region (HMPR) located between the UNAcGCT gene and the 16S rRNA coding region. Two promoters, P1 and PCL1, appear to play pivotal roles in mycobacterial rRNA synthesis; they are present in all of the species examined and are the only promoters used for rRNA synthesis by the pathogenic slow growers. P1 is located within the coding region of the UNAcGCT gene, and PCL1 has a characteristic sequence that is related to but distinct from that of the additional promoters. In fast-growing species, P1 and PCL1 produce less than 10% of rRNA transcripts, so the additional promoters found in the HMPR are important in increasing the potential for rRNA synthesis during rapid growth. In contrast, rrnB operons appear to be regulated by a single promoter; because less divergence has taken place, rrnB appears to be younger than rrnA.
URL: 98037490
Ref #: 13151
Author(s): Turenne,C.Y.;Tschetter,L.;Wolfe,J.;Kabani,A.
Journal: J Clin Microbiol
Title: Necessity of quality-controlled 16S rRNA gene sequence databases: identifying nontuberculous Mycobacterium species
Volume: 39
Page(s): 3637-48
Year: 2001
Keyword(s): *Databases, Nucleic Acid *Genes, rRNA Human Internet Mycobacterium/*classification/genetics Mycobacterium Infections/*microbiology Phylogeny Quality Control RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/*genetics Reference Standards *Sequence Analysis, DNA Species Specificity
Remarks: The use of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) provides a faster and better ability to accurately identify them in addition to contributing significantly in the discovery of new species. Despite their associated problems, many rely on the use of public sequence databases for sequence comparisons. To best evaluate the taxonomic status of NTM species submitted to our reference laboratory, we have created a 16S rRNA sequence database by sequencing 121 American Type Culture Collection strains encompassing 92 species of mycobacteria, and have also included chosen unique mycobacterial sequences from public sequence repositories. In addition, the Ribosomal Differentiation of Medical Microorganisms (RIDOM) service has made freely available on the Internet mycobacterial identification by 16S rRNA analysis. We have evaluated 122 clinical NTM species using our database, comparing >1,400 bp of the 16S gene, and the RIDOM database, comparing approximately 440 bp. The breakdown of analysis was as follows: 61 strains had a sequence with 100% similarity to the type strain of an established species, 19 strains showed a 1- to 5-bp divergence from an established species, 11 strains had sequences corresponding to uncharacterized strain sequences in public databases, and 31 strains represented unique sequences. Our experience with analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of patient strains has shown that clear-cut results are not the rule. As many clinical, research, and environmental laboratories currently employ 16S-based identification of bacteria, including mycobacteria, a freely available quality-controlled database such as that provided by RIDOM is essential to accurately identify species or detect true sequence variations leading to the discovery of new species.
URL: 21458757
Ref #: 1300
Author(s): Skerman,V.B.D.;McGowan,V.;Sneath,P.H.A.(ed)
Journal: Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
Title: Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.
Volume: 30
Page(s): 225-420
Year: 1980
Ref #: 6924
Author(s): DeutschesInstitutfürNormungDIN.NormenausschußMedizin(NAMed)
Title: DIN 58959-7. Qualitätsmanagement in der medizinischen Mikrobiologie. Teil 7: Allgemeine Anforderungen an das Mitführen von Kontrollstämmen. Beiblatt 2: ATCC- und DSM-Nummern häufig verwendeter Kontrollstämme.
Year: 1997
Data: Type strain / F. M. Perry, RAMC in 1921 / Tortoise tubercle / Myobacterium tuberculosis cold blooded type
Accession Date: 01/01/1921
History: PERRY F M, RAMC
Authority: (Bergey et al. 1923) Kubica et al. 1972
Depositor: PERRY F M
Taxonomy: TaxLink: S1942 (Mycobacterium chelonae subspecies chelonae (bergey et al. 1923) kubica et al. 1972) - Date of change: 16/06/2007 by NCTCUp to 16/06/2007: ? (NCTC 946) - Date of change: 04/02/2003
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